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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
campaign experts. >> i think if you look at the president has done with the economy, it is very far reaching, just across the country women have access to capital to start small business, let's not forget his very, very first bill that he signed in to law was lily ledbetter fair pay act. it's a tremendous accomplishment. i think that shows his devotion and his commitment to women. >> first thing you have to ask is, what are women concerned about today, it's jobs, job security, opportunities for themselves and for their loved ones and in particular for their kidss there a brighter future. this is mitt romney's message to women to all americans. is that he is going to put in to place economic policies that will create growth which will create the jobs, be the ergy to small businesses start growing again. >> we asked the experts whether reproductive rights is a decisive issue for women voters this year. >> it is for the barack obama campaign. they think that's the way they're going to keep their women. suggest that women would vote about who's going to pay for their contraception, that
, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be true in this case? >> well, no. this is a natural disaster. disasters are bad for the economy. obviously, the big hit to the economy initially, is what we're seing in new york. you do get rebuilding, and economy benefits from that, but net, net, the economy is in a worse place. natural disasters are bad for the economy, not good. >> susie: you heard in erica's remit some businesses are going to benefit, maybe hox*echl builders and cuk companies. if you look at the economy, who are the winners and losers in terms of various sectors? >> well, there's more losers than winners. the losers would be the restaurants, they're not going to serve meals that aren't getting served. airlines, trucking companies, you know, the casinos fnlt fshs services. the secretaried to and trading is shutownor a couple of days, never get that back. the winners are clear. the homebuilders, home improvement, you mentioned home depot and loews and hardware stores. online retailers might benefit because department stores are closed. so some winn
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy f 160 ars. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. an by ntritionto yr pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: an important snapshot of the country's economic growth was released today, a week and a half before the election. with positive, but still slow, improvement, the white house and the romney campaign offered different assessments. a late boost in consumer spending was a major factor in the economic news from the commerce department. gross domestic oduct-- the broadest gauge of the country's enomic health-- grew at a 2% rate from july through september, slightly better than the 1.8% economists had predicted, and an improvement over the 1.3% growth in the previous quarter. another positive si
making closing arguments on an issue that's been front and center throughout the campaign. did an economy in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring.
their attention back to the economy today; investors and traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new ai for unemployment insurance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing modest improvement in the jobs picture. we'll have more on jobs in a moment. as for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was up 42, the s&p adding 15. >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: fr and a ha mlion pple are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and
about longer delays, and return to normal production and slightly bigger hit on the economy. s this's certainly true. >> tom: what about the impact on the job market. we were supposed to have the october jobs numbers this friday. still expected to come out. not going to be impacted because of this storm but what about november's numbers? >> that's a great question. sometime these major events, those storms are right in the mile of the reference period during which bls measures employment. but sandy is occurring almost directly between october's reference month and november's reference month, actually-- impact of this on the official government numbers for employment. >> tom: just 20 seconds left but damage to confidence at all, consumer confidence? >> no, i think not. people are resilient. they will see through this. they'll get back to the business of rebuilding which of course is a plus for gdp and back to that activity very quickly. >> we hope it happens faster than not. joeling prkenith us, a lookt the economy, macroeconomic advisors. it may seem a bit premature to talk about th
the impact on our economy. and on transportation. you know, the election will take care of itself next week. >> and here is what governor romney said. >> on the eastern coast of our nation, a lot of people are enduring some very difficult times. >> and our hearts and our prayers go to them as we think about how tough it is going to be there. i don't think there has been a hurricane in ohio in a long time. but there have been some hurricanes that have caused a lot of damage across this country and hurt a lot of families and their families are in harm's ways that will be hurt either in their possessions or perhaps even something more severe. >> we have faced these kind of challenges before and as we have, it is good to see how americans come together and this looks le another time when we need to come together, all across the country, even here in ohio and make sure we give of our support of the people who need it. >> rose: several national polls have the president and governor romney in a virtual dead heat coming down the stretch, some others have different results when you look at the swing
this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. what we know isboron is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of the republican party. what i think i funny -- >> it's not unrepresentative enough that candidate romney is willing to drop that ad. >> i think it's not representative of the republican party. how i'm going to finish answering the question is that what's happening is democrats and president obama are doing a trumped-up war on women. they started it up in majority of. march. women are smarter than that. romney is tied 47% with oba outhe vot this is about our pocketbooks and bank accounts and jobs and women has been effected with the j
support. >> the economy grew at an annual rate of 2%. not great, but better than expected. right here i have a very shaky limb and i will ask you to step out on it. the election were held tomorrow, mark, and who would win? >> i should not go out on any limb, given my weight. barack obama would win based upon the superior effort of the obama campaign a this point and in turning out early voters. >> evan ? >> obama, but we still have a way to go. >> nina? >> i hate doing this, but obama because of the crown them. >> colby? >> national tracking polls has of them close, but the key battleground states, obama still holds a lead. >> what is the ground game, mark? >> the organized effort over months to identify and not only support -- identified not only supporters, but leaners, and persuade them on how one by one retail basis. weeks before election day, you know who your voters are. you want to be sure you get the vote. >> in many of the battle ground states, obama has more field offices. >> it is down to micromanaging, micro-issuing these of votes. interestingly, the republicans had a better
it shows the economy is virtually at a standstill because basically the unemployment rate is where it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look a the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but inrestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes demographic information and the unemployment information doesn't always sync up. >> tom: timing is everything in terms o
and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayorpoind to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where is there a model, steve, of a city in the world that's responded to the challenge? >> well, it depends on how much wealth you have. i mean holland, the netherlands is essentially an engineered country that if in the absence of its wealth and its willingness to spend that wealth on engineering the seas to keep low lands occupied by dutch people, it wouldn't be a viable country. the question for t ited states is because we are a coastal country with, as one of the other guests said 4 million people at least at high tide never mind back up a bit to account for three feet of higher seas in 30 or 40 years. this is not a problem that can be solved by engineering alone. not on a national scale. manhattan could solve it by engineering is alone, at least for half a century but the whole count c. e question is really from a policy perspective, from a taxpayer's perspective, trying to break the cycle of, i think p
the american economy and essentially saved it by kicking out all of these good-for-nothing ceos and making companies, once again, economically efficient and productive. these folks think they're heroes and they saved america. and the public thinks they are villains and their whole job is to enrich themselves and destroy jobs. >> narrator: the aftermath of some of the leveraged buyout deals was devastating: bankruptcies, factory closures, employees laid off. >> bain capital was never set up to be a b crtion program. it was set up to make wealthy investors even wealthier. they didn't sit around the table talking about how many jobs this would create. oftentimes it was the opposite, how many jobs could be cut to make the company more efficient. >> mitt is a person who wants to be successful. making money is how you're measured in the private equity and venture capital business, but you're making money for your investors first and foremost, and that was always mitt's focus was to make money for them. >> narrator: the way those closest to him tell it, he had come to see himself as a white knigh
to tackle deflation and support the economy. bank of japan officials are seen on tuesday to decide on extra monetary easing for a second month in a row. high on the agenda is the purchase of an asset purchase program. officials will discuss if they need to clarify the timing for reaching a goal of 1% inflation. let's check on the markets now. u.s. exchanges are closed as they batted down for the storm so let's look at some numbers and see how stocks here in japan are opening this tuesday. we go to ramin who is at the tokyo stock exchange. how are stocks kicking off ts >> very good morning. let's have a look at some of the data that came out. unemployment coming at 4.2%. that's unchanged. we did have preliminary industrial production that came at minus 4.1%. that's the third consecutive month of declines there. there's relating to the industrial production part of it. there is a big focus on how tokyo will trad both indexes are trading higher this tuesday, october 30th and both indexes as you can see on the screen up in the first few minutes of trading. investors will see what the bank of ja
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working t solve soci and environment problems at homand oundhe world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: hurricane sandy beg battering its way ashore today, threatening days of destruction. the huge system had 50 million people in its sights and was already being called a superstorm. the winds grew stronger by the hour. and the rain poured harder, soaking the east coast as the hurricane closed in. nine states declared emergencies, and people up and down the coast braced for heavy flooding, wind damage, and resulting power outages. >> i just got another load of sandbags to put around the doors to keep the water out. got the generator ready to go. and we're going to sit there and ride it out. no place else to go.
that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of econoc growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. th a couple of dras. at cld be betteroreepi peopleatchg? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between the powerful and the powerless. wall street, global
get a comprehensive program. i do believe that's one of the reasons the economy is sluggish now. it was 2012 where the banks started increasing their loan. if you make the banks all profitable again it will take care of the rest of the economy and it doesn't work that way. >> rose: so you're not happy with the tarp program which others see as a success? >> how do you define "succs?" we ddn't go ove the cff. >> rose: and a lot of the loans have been paid back. >> on a cash-flow basis the tarp investment money has made money. if you look at it from a subs key standpoint-- in order, if citypaid 5% dividend, if they had to go to the market what would they have had to pay? it will never turn a profit on that basis. >> rose: the financial structure was so bad the interest rates would have been so high. >> people differ on how they measure costs, and ithi, again,n a subdy bas, if you looked at subsidies, they would not have made my -- >> rose: there is this. whenever i read about you during that time or whenever i talked to you, whenever i sat next to you at some event, the central thi
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other w
because the problem is so huge that they can't reallyhange the suctural economy and military policy, foreign policy, in two, four years. he laid the groundwork, but i don't think he's achieved as much as he wanted or as the people expected. >> we just heard from the professor about foreign policy. how do you think obama has changed the u.s. approach? >> right, well, obama had said repeatedly that america is a pacific nation. and he's been refocusing foreign policy toward asia. commanders at the pentagon really poured resourcetowards this region. and obama tried to strengthen economic ties, for example, congress passed a free trade fact with south korea. but mitt romney and others say obama still hasn't done enough on issues such as the currency disparity with china. republicans say his approach to nuclear weapons is misguided. the professor says somewhere along the way, obama got sidetracked. >> like the working without nuclear weapons, he had an idea and this global vision, but middle east was so volatile and promising at the same time. during his administration. and naturally i th
that economy is booming so fast that no one can control it anymore. for me the ahasing thing is that i can say that in relation to "silent house" is that i've been living for 60 years. there've vn times that i've come back this or that that the change i sa in th first 45 years less than the change i saw in the last 15 years. >> wow. how is it different? change in the last 15? is it just velocity? >> velocity. immense economical -- political change is more development of say -- development of free speech and liberal society and because of economics and it's hard to control turkey anyre. it's s ri and coming that it's hard to crush it down and control it. >> rose: as i a writer do you -- and because of the run in you had you were criticized for criticizing turkey, correct? >> yes. >> rose: they arrested you. >> no. >> rose: well, they didn't arrest you but -- >> i was fined but then it was dropped because of international pressure. >> rose: exactly. i understand that. do you fear at all now what you have to be careful that you make sure what you say is understood for what you mean? >> these are
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 0 years. bnf, t engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really unsettling becauswe d't he por. w
't know what to study so the first university i went to was economy university. i did it for a year. then two years of law. basically i didn't really know what i wanted to do. and it seemed the right thing that my parents said as long as you study we will pay for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, califnia, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house forlunch and threas a fot owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to
is the same thing. with a are we going to do to get people working and grow the economy? how are we going to address the housingrisis and what are you going to do to protect medicare and social security? i have strong positions on those issues. my opponent does not. >> reporter: tarkanian has benefited from his family's well known name here but failed to win an election in three prior attempts at public office. he has his own take on this race. >> i've tried very hard to get out to all the different areas within the community. i've had business meetings. i've had meetings with business leaders in the african-american community talking about businesses who are there and how we can help them get started and expand. at the same ti i've been out in areas talking to the onion farmers and some of the ranchers about the issues they're dealing with with workers and so forth. i've tried very hard to be a good representative and good a good understanding of what's important for those constituents. >> reporter: in august the campaign was infused with racial tension when tarkanian seemed to suggest t
books and the economy of ebooks is much more attractive no paper cost no printing, no contribution cost, no returns. >> no returns. >> huge advance, so at what point do publishers say hey, i have-- it's crazy to me economically to be publishings and printing booksing printing books, not publishing ebooks that is such a good point because in most other countries there were no hard bound booksment we did hard cover to help our p & l, our profit and loss statement. i do think that the hard cover book will start to diminish in quantity, yes. i don't believe that the publisher, that a true publisher will ever give up on printing physical books. >> i disagree with that. >> but, well, but i will talk to you about that. because i think that there will always be a want and a need for a certain group of society to have the printed book. and perhaps the printed book will become even more expensive and more valuable because it will be printed better and it will be done on better paper, et cetera. but i think the point of marketing is where this is all, where this all comes to. and how do you now sell your book
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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